Spring in St. Louis
24, June 2016

PrideFest's Wreath-Laying Origins

After retiring from the U.S. Air Force in 2007, I immediately got more involved with my local LGBT community in St. Louis, Missouri. I knew PrideFest happened each year, and I thought it would be a nice idea to get a group of LGBT veterans together and walk in the Pride Parade to celebrate our military service and LGBT identity, a testament to the fact that our nation’s miliary branches are made up of not only straight persons but gay persons as well. Read more »

20, June 2016

Shades of Summer

Sunglasses are synonymous with summer, and we happen to have several pairs in our collections. Here's a glimpse of five pairs that show how the frames and glass tinting have evolved over time.

1. Globe-trotters

These green shades made the journey with Charles Lindbergh on his historic 1927 flight from New York to Paris. Whether he wore them or not is up in the air. The information accompanying the sunglasses says Lindbergh "reportedly put them on but realized they were a danger because they'd make it too easy to fall asleep." Read more »

17, June 2016

Pierre Laclède: Father Figure

Ask St. Louisans the question "Who's the father of St. Louis?" and most can tell you the answer in a heartbeat: Pierre Laclède. But what many may not realize is that the famed French fur trader had children and a family of his own . . . though his family structure was a bit unorthodox for the time. Read more »

14, June 2016

4 Boss Suffragettes of Missouri History

Welcome to the Suffragette Edition of our look at the boss women of Missouri history. We’re recognizing these four women today in honor of the centennial of the Golden Lane, when nearly 2,000 suffragettes donned yellow sashes, busted out their yellow parasols, and lined St. Louis's Locust Street for miles. This visible call for women’s voting rights occurred during the 1916 Democratic Convention. Read more »

13, June 2016

A Hamilton Revelation

Confession time? Here’s what I got: I’ve always loved and been fascinated by history, but I tend to be drawn more to European and ancient Egyptian history than American history. There’s just more of it to appreciate and try to understand. Read more »

9, June 2016

Revitalizing Soldiers: Processing the Collections

The Soldiers Memorial Military Museum’s collections are a time capsule. Encompassing thousands of donations dating back to Soldiers Memorial's opening in 1938, the collections were relatively untouched when my team and I began processing them in October 2014. In order to gain intellectual control over the collections (to know what we had and where it was), my team and I were tasked with inventorying every single item with the help of a digital database system—a first in Soldiers Memorial's nearly 80-year history. Read more »

6, June 2016

Go South to Sunny Germany

The collection of the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum is as vast as it is interesting, encompassing the breadth of U.S. military history from the War of 1812 to the current armed forces. Part of my role as military and arms curator, is to identify interesting stories and artifacts from the collection for the new exhibits being created as part of the Museum’s revitalization. This process has led to many great discoveries. Read more »

3, June 2016

More Than Just Black Paper

Although the focus of Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night is on the dresses and the way the color black has evolved in women’s fashion over the years, the exhibit also highlights Victorian-era expressions of grief that went beyond clothing, such as mourning stationery. Read more »

27, May 2016

Looking Back: The Great Cyclone of 1896

Shortly after 5pm on Wednesday, May 27, 1896, one of the largest tornadoes in American history swept through St. Louis, wreaking havoc on the city and neighboring East St. Louis. More than 250 people were killed in just 20 minutes. This tragic incident remains one of the most costly and devastating natural disasters in American history. Click through the gallery below to relive the aftermath of that fateful day through images from our collection.  Read more »

25, May 2016

Looking Back: The St. Louis Arena

Today the St. Louis Blues call downtown's Scottrade Center home, but many of you likely have fond memories of their former home—the St. Louis Arena. Opened in 1929 in St. Louis's Dogtown neighborhood, the Arena was known as the Checkerdome from 1977 to 1983 after the building and the team were purchased by Ralston Purina. The iconic St. Louis building was demolished after the Blues moved to their new home, the Kiel Center (now the Scottrade Center), in 1994. Click through the gallery below to see the Arena's story through images and artifacts from our collection. Read more »