A Walk in 1875 St. Louis
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Some of the textiles in our collection
Some of the textiles in our collection... Read More
20, April 2015

From the Collections: Whimsical Mechanical Banks

Cast iron mechanical banks became popular in the 19th century after the Civil War. During the war the Union and Confederate sides began creating their own paper money to help deal with the shortage on coins. However, the public was leery of the new currency due to its lack of intrinsic value. Coins would retain some value due to the metal, regardless of whatever occurred within the government. Penny banks were meant to educate children about the importance of being thrifty through the use of a fun and exciting toy. Read more »

17, April 2015

War or Negotiation? Political Divisions and the Mississippi Crisis

No matter your political stripe, you’ve probably heard and agreed with the following sentiment at some point in the last few years: “Congress never gets anything done! The founding fathers would be rolling in their graves if they heard about the ways Congress was dealing with [insert current event]!” Popular opinion polls make it clear that many of us harbor at least a part of that sentiment: In a January 2015 Gallup opinion poll, congressional approval was at a mere 16 percent. Read more »

14, April 2015

Commemorating Abraham Lincoln's Death

Today marks the 150-year anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination. In 1865, as people around the nation and around the world learned of the horrible news, they recorded their reactions in many forms—from written materials like diaries and letters to commemorative items like ribbons and flags. For the first time in one place, you can see personal items and remembrances from the Americans whose lives were touched by the president’s death and its aftermath. Read more »

9, April 2015

World War I Artifacts and Memories: St. Charles Car Company

Following the outbreak of war in Europe in 1914, industries across the United States recognized opportunity and began to shift their focus to building war materials for the belligerent nations. The St. Louis region was no exception, and from 1914 to 1918 an industrial boom ensued. One of the many companies in the area to benefit from government contracts was the St. Charles Car Company. Read more »

1, April 2015

Sylvestre Labbadie Jr. and the French Connections of Colonial St. Louis

Colonial St. Louisans had to go to great lengths in order to maintain their ties to French culture. Their village, after all, was small and at the very edge of the part of North America that Europeans had explored. In order to maintain their ties to France and French culture, St. Louisans traveled to France or to towns in North America that also had a strong French culture, like New Orleans or Montreal. They also brought in French goods such as fabrics, home décor, and books in order to try to keep up with the latest trends in Paris. Read more »

30, March 2015

Civil War Love Letters: Jessie Love Stuart, Lewis B. Stuart Jr., and the Letters

This is the last post in our series. All of the letters have been compiled into a book, My Dear Molly: The Civil War Letters of Captain James Love, which is available now. You can hear Molly Kodner talk about the project at 7 pm on Tuesday, April 7, at the Museum.
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27, March 2015

WWI Artifacts and Memories: Fritz Von Versen’s Letters from the German Front

At the outbreak of World War I, Missouri and St. Louis had a substantial population claiming German origins or heritage. The percentage of Missouri’s population that was first-generation German was 11.2, the largest immigrant group in the state, and 20% of St. Louis’s population was either born in Germany or claimed both parents were born in Germany. Read more »

26, March 2015

St. Louis Gallery to Feature a Retrospective of Max Starkloff's Paintings

The Bruno David Gallery in St. Louis will host Max Starkloff: A Retrospective from March 27 to June 27. The exhibition will feature several paintings by the late Max Starkloff. Read more »

25, March 2015

A Place to Call Home

We are the Teens Make History Exhibitors, and our job at the Missouri History Museum is to work on exhibit projects. For example, over the past couple of years, the Teens Make History Exhibitors have completed projects such as Between Two Worlds: Veterans Journey Home, an exhibit that looked at veterans returning from war, and Avenues of Activism, an oral history project exploring activism in St. Louis regarding civil, labor, and LGBT rights. We are currently in the midst of our third project cycle, which is an interactive game called A Place to Call Home. Read more »

23, March 2015

Celebrating Women’s History Year Round

One of my favorite objects in our Reflections gallery is a print of the March 1919 cover of The Missouri Woman. In bold letters at the bottom of the cover it reads “Suffrage Triumphant.” This triumph was the Missouri House’s passage of the Presidential Suffrage Bill on February 12. This bill wasn’t a close victory either; it passed by a vote of 123 to 7. If the Senate passed this bill Governor Fredrick Gardner would sign it into law. Only a month prior to the House passing the bill, Governor Gardner had this to say about woman’s suffrage: Read more »