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A Walk in 1875 St. Louis
Artifact Madness 2015
26, March 2015

St. Louis Gallery to Feature a Retrospective of Max Starkloff's Paintings

The Bruno David Gallery in St. Louis will host Max Starkloff: A Retrospective from March 27 to June 27. The exhibition will feature several paintings by the late Max Starkloff. Read more »

25, March 2015

A Place to Call Home

We are the Teens Make History Exhibitors, and our job at the Missouri History Museum is to work on exhibit projects. For example, over the past couple of years, the Teens Make History Exhibitors have completed projects such as Between Two Worlds: Veterans Journey Home, an exhibit that looked at veterans returning from war, and Avenues of Activism, an oral history project exploring activism in St. Louis regarding civil, labor, and LGBT rights. We are currently in the midst of our third project cycle, which is an interactive game called A Place to Call Home. Read more »

23, March 2015

Celebrating Women’s History Year Round

One of my favorite objects in our Reflections gallery is a print of the March 1919 cover of The Missouri Woman. In bold letters at the bottom of the cover it reads “Suffrage Triumphant.” This triumph was the Missouri House’s passage of the Presidential Suffrage Bill on February 12. This bill wasn’t a close victory either; it passed by a vote of 123 to 7. If the Senate passed this bill Governor Fredrick Gardner would sign it into law. Only a month prior to the House passing the bill, Governor Gardner had this to say about woman’s suffrage: Read more »

18, March 2015

Remembering Lincoln

The Missouri Historical Society is excited to contribute items to the new Remembering Lincoln digital collection, created by Ford’s Theatre for the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

Left: “Abraham Lincoln Telling a Story.” Graphite drawing by unknown artist, 1864. Missouri Historical Society.

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17, March 2015

The Louisiana Purchase and the Constitutionalism of Thomas Jefferson

The Louisiana Purchase Treaty was officially announced to the people of the United States on July 4, 1803. That day, subscribers to the National Intelligencer and Washington Advertiser saw the following announcement: Read more »

17, March 2015

A Welsh Bard in St. Louis

March 1 was St. David’s Day, when Welsh people (the Cymry) all over the world celebrated their patron saint’s birthday. If you have any of the following surnames or your ancestors do, you’re Cymric! These are just a few: Baines/Banes, Blevins, Bowen, Cadwallader, Davies/Davis, Ellis, Evans/Bevan, Howell, Hughes, Jenkins, Jones, Lloyd, Llewelyn, Loy, Maddox, Merrick, Morgan, Morris, Powell, Perkins, Price/Pryce, Parry,Rees/Reese/Reece/Rhys, Thomas, Thompson, Vaughn, and Williams. Read more »

13, March 2015

WWI Artifacts and Memories—Gas Warfare

The First World War debuted ruinous tools of warfare that wreaked havoc on the warring armies. Among these were the machine gun, the armored tank, aircraft, and chemical warfare. All of these technologies had seen limited service around the world in the years prior, but until World War I they had not been utilized to such a devastating degree. Read more »

5, March 2015

The Louisiana Purchase and the Haitian Revolution

What makes the Louisiana Purchase such a defining moment in American history is the very fact that many of us couldn’t imagine our nation without it. Just think about it for a second: How different would the history of the United States be if the nation’s western boundary stopped at the Mississippi River? It would change the very fabric of how Americans imagine themselves, how the economy of the country works, and how the nation was shaped. Indeed, many of you reading this right now might not have even been Americans if not for the Louisiana Purchase. Read more »

5, March 2015

Artifact Madness 2015 Starts on March 9!

In April 2016, an exciting new exhibit will open at the Museum—Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night will feature more than 60 dresses from the Missouri History Museum's world-renowned textile collection. This fun but thought-provoking exhibit will explore the subject of mourning, as well as the transition of black from a symbol of grief to a symbol of high fashion.  Read more »

2, March 2015

Civil War Love Letters: After the War

After an extraordinary life that included immigrating to the United States from Ireland, traveling to Australia and living there for four years, and then surviving four years of war, James Love married Molly Wilson on May 2, 1865, and then had an ordinary, presumably happy, life. Unfortunately, he did not leave behind any correspondence, diaries, or other papers to document the rest of his life, but city directories, the census, and other sources at least provide information on where he lived and his occupation. Read more »