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25, November 2017

5 Famous Authors' Takes on St. Louis

St. Louis has a history of producing wordsmiths who recall their hometown fondly, but what about writers who aren't from here? We pulled some of the most entertaining assessments dating back to the 1920s and 1930s from the book Seeking St. Louis: Voices from a River City, 1670–2000 and the scrapbooks Read more »

22, October 2017

The Importance (And Challenges) of One Red Flyer

Panoramas of the City features some pretty breathtaking objects that immediately capture your attention as you make your way through the exhibit. There’s a stunning dress from a Veiled Prophet queen, a carefully restored 1927 Ford Model T Fordor Sedan, and a collection of some of the most eye-catching medals and awards won by Charles Lindbergh. Read more »

29, August 2017

A Panoramic Preview

Over the past several years, the Missouri History Museum has helped people experience different aspects of St. Louis history like never before. A Walk in 1875 St. Louis explored one amazing year in our city’s past, Route 66 revealed local history through a road that connected our region to the nation, and #1 in Civil Rights brought to light our city’s incredible contributions to the continued struggle for equality. Our newest exhibit, Panoramas of the City, continues this tradition. Read more »

21, May 2017

Does the World Still Care about Charles Lindbergh?

On May 21, 1927, airmail pilot Charles Lindbergh became the first person to fly nonstop across the Atlantic Ocean. As he navigated the Spirit of St. Louis from New York to Paris, the world watched closely. When the plane touched down at Le Bourget Airport in Paris, a jubilant crowd greeted the aviator and created shockwaves of excitement that could be felt around the globe. Newspaper headlines lauded Lindbergh’s feat, throngs of people followed his every move, and various heads of state and dignitaries awarded him with medals of honor and extraordinary gifts. Read more »

23, January 2017

6 Writing Wonders—Or Not

In today's texting-obsessed world, some would argue that our collective handwriting skills are tanking and that penmanship is destined to become a lost art. Au contraire! Although past St. Louisans would surely be baffled by a QWERTY keyboard, we're betting they'd praise the efforts of educators learning how to teach children cursive in response to updated Missouri learning standards. Read more »

3, January 2017

We Made History in 2016

There are record-breaking years, and then there are years like 2016 at the Missouri History Museum. We're still crunching the numbers on what will go down as one of the most successful years in our 150-year history, but here's what we can say for sure: Read more »

9, November 2016

The Aerial Crossroads of America Is Full of Surprises

While researching and writing The Aerial Crossroads of America: St. Louis’s Lambert Airport, I encountered many surprising facets of the airport’s history. Read more »

9, August 2016

Missouri Historical Society: The Next 50 Years (1917–1967)

The Missouri Historical Society celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2016. This is the second in a three-part series on the organization's history. You can read the first installment here.
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20, June 2016

Shades of Summer

Sunglasses are synonymous with summer, and we happen to have several pairs in our collections. Here's a glimpse of five pairs that show how the frames and glass tinting have evolved over time.

1. Globe-trotters

These green shades made the journey with Charles Lindbergh on his historic 1927 flight from New York to Paris. Whether he wore them or not is up in the air. The information accompanying the sunglasses says Lindbergh "reportedly put them on but realized they were a danger because they'd make it too easy to fall asleep." Read more »

15, April 2016

Lindbergh and the World's Largest Airline

In most years, April 15 marks the day procrastinators throughout the United States scramble to turn in their tax forms to the IRS. But that’s not the only reason April 15 is important. On this day 90 years ago, the world’s largest airline took flight for the first time—and Missouri, Charles Lindbergh, and the U.S. mail all played a part. Read more »