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20, October 2017

A Personal Quest to Prove St. Louis the Best

For much of the United States of America’s first century, its national capital was a half-built city in a swamp. As the country expanded westward, and particularly in the years just after the Civil War, loud voices clamored for the removal of the US capital from Washington, DC. They argued that it was simply common sense to move it to the geographic center of the country: St. Louis, Missouri. Read more »

30, August 2017

The Case of the Mysterious Blue Writing

One of the most magnificent rooms in all of mid-19th-century St. Louis was . . . a private library in a Carondelet home. That home, and many of the more than 900 books within it, belonged to Henry T. Blow, a lawyer who made most of his fortune through manufacturing and mining. He also spent time in Venezuela and Brazil as a U.S. ambassador. Blow is a prominent St. Louis figure even now, as is his daughter, Susan, the well-educated, well-traveled woman who brought public kindergarten to the United States. Read more »