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29, August 2017

A Panoramic Preview

Over the past several years, the Missouri History Museum has helped people experience different aspects of St. Louis history like never before. A Walk in 1875 St. Louis explored one amazing year in our city’s past, Route 66 revealed local history through a road that connected our region to the nation, and #1 in Civil Rights brought to light our city’s incredible contributions to the continued struggle for equality. Our newest exhibit, Panoramas of the City, continues this tradition. Read more »

14, August 2017

History in the Heavens

It’s a rare day I’d say this, but on the early afternoon of August 21, I really hope you’re NOT inside the Missouri History Museum. In fact, I hope you’re not even in Forest Park! If you are, you’ll miss the history happening outside. Read more »

8, August 2017

Reaching Beyond Our Walls

Here at the Missouri History Museum we’re committed to connecting all St. Louisans with our shared history. That includes those who face barriers to visiting us, like the youth at the St. Louis County Juvenile Detention Center. Read more »

7, July 2017

Missouri and the Great War Travels Statewide

EDITOR’S NOTE: If you’ve visited the Missouri History Museum’s World War I: Missouri and the Great War exhibit and want to see additional stories about the Show-Me state’s role in the conflict, consider tracking down the traveling exhibit we helped put together as part of a statewide archival project. Guest author Brian Grubbs, of the Springfield-Greene County Library District, shares the details below. Read more »

3, July 2017

“A Stain on the Name of America”: The Nation Reacts

Welcome to our three-part series about the 1917 East St. Louis race riot. This post covers events after the riot. To find out what happened before it and during it, click here.

The two ends of Illinois smoldered in uncertainty on July 3, 1917. Read more »

2, July 2017

“This Was the Apocalypse”: East St. Louis, July 2, 1917

Welcome to our three-part series about the 1917 East St. Louis race riot. This post covers events during the riot. To find out what happened before it and its aftermath, click here.

In the evening of July 2, 1917, 11-year-old Freda McDonald was laying on the bed she shared with her siblings, studying the peculiar humming sound growing outside her family’s small shack on Gratiot Street, near downtown St. Louis. Read more »

1, July 2017

“A City without a Social Contract”: Tensions in St. Louis's Industrial Suburb

Welcome to our three-part series about the 1917 East St. Louis race riot. This post covers events leading up to the riot. To find out what happened during it and its aftermath, click here.

“Money tree . . . all you have to do is go up there and shake it.” That’s the visual impoverished Southern blacks used to describe East St. Louis in 1916, according to Lyman Bluitt, a local black doctor. Read more »

22, June 2017

Live-Tweeting the East St. Louis Race Riot of 1917

In less than 48 hours—from the evening of July 1, 1917, to midday on July 3, 1917—East St. Louis descended into one of the deadliest race riots in U.S. history. As many as 200 African Americans were killed, hundreds more were left homeless, and large sections of the city were ruined. The national response ranks among the foundational moments of the modern civil rights movement, but like much so of our region’s civil rights history, the East St. Louis race riot's legacy has faded outside of museums and history textbooks. Read more »

23, May 2017

How James B. Eads Conquered the Mighty Mississippi

The Mississippi River has beckoned millions of people to settle up and down its fertile banks, inspiring countless creative works. It has been personified in song, and its ever-changing nature has been used as a metaphor for life itself. But James Buchanan Eads didn’t find inspiration on the Mississippi’s surface—he found it below. Read more »

21, May 2017

Does the World Still Care about Charles Lindbergh?

On May 21, 1927, airmail pilot Charles Lindbergh became the first person to fly nonstop across the Atlantic Ocean. As he navigated the Spirit of St. Louis from New York to Paris, the world watched closely. When the plane touched down at Le Bourget Airport in Paris, a jubilant crowd greeted the aviator and created shockwaves of excitement that could be felt around the globe. Newspaper headlines lauded Lindbergh’s feat, throngs of people followed his every move, and various heads of state and dignitaries awarded him with medals of honor and extraordinary gifts. Read more »