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11, November 2017

WWI Victory Celebrations and Homecomings

World War I ended on November 11, 1918, with the declaration of an armistice. The four-year fight claimed millions of lives and displaced millions more. The United States played a brief yet pivotal role in the war, spearheading the Meuse-Argonne Offensive that forced Germany’s surrender. Read more »

18, October 2017

Selling a War: World War I Propaganda

American leaders faced quite the public-relations crisis after finally deciding to enter World War I in April 1917. During the preceding three years of fighting in Europe, a serious split had developed in the United States between those who favored preparedness, including former president Theodore Roosevelt, and those who supported neutrality. The latter consisted of people who believed the fight was “Europe’s War” and first- and second-generation Europeans, often Germans, who wanted to avoid conflict with their native lands. St. Read more »

8, September 2017

Celebrating Scott Field's Centennial

After the US voted to enter World War I in April 1917, the need for military pilots grew, and those pilots had to have places to train. Aviator Albert Bond Lambert worked with local business leaders and government officials to secure 624 acres of land near Belleville, Illinois, to establish a training field for pilots, ground crew, and mechanics. The Unit Construction Company of St. Louis was hired to begin construction in June 1917 and immediately set to leveling the landing field, establishing a rail spur, and erecting dozens of buildings, including hangars and barracks. Read more »

5, August 2017

The Missouri National Guard Prepares for War

When the United States entered World War I, it had a standing army of fewer than 130,000 troops, with an additional 70,000 troops in the reserves. To put that in perspective, at the start of the war in 1914, Germany had a combined standing army and reserve force of 4.5 million. Read more »

7, July 2017

Missouri and the Great War Travels Statewide

EDITOR’S NOTE: If you’ve visited the Missouri History Museum’s World War I: Missouri and the Great War exhibit and want to see additional stories about the Show-Me state’s role in the conflict, consider tracking down the traveling exhibit we helped put together as part of a statewide archival project. Guest author Brian Grubbs, of the Springfield-Greene County Library District, shares the details below. Read more »

29, May 2017

Commemorating the Spirit of Sacrifice in War

Since it opened on Memorial Day 1938, Soldiers Memorial Military Museum has been—and continues to be—a place of remembrance. At its dedication as a World War I memorial two years earlier, President Franklin D. Roosevelt said: Read more »

6, April 2017

World War I: Missouri and the Great War

Today marks the centennial of America’s entry into World War I. Within months of the April 6, 1917, declaration of war, U.S. troops began arriving in France, factories across the nation started producing war material, and support began pouring in from the home front. Our newest exhibit, World War I: Missouri and the Great War, commemorates this significant portion of our collective history by exploring the wartime roles of Missourians and St. Louisans at home and overseas.  Read more »

21, March 2017

Mighty Military Women

Women have participated in nearly every major war in this country starting as far back as the Civil War, when hundreds of women disguised themselves as men to serve as secret soldiers, and others nursed the wounded. Read more »

12, November 2016

Naming Fred W. Stockham–St. Louis Post 4

Around Veterans Day, I’m always reminded of the long-running connections St. Louis has with veterans' organizations, specifically the American Legion. St. Louis played host to the first domestic caucus of the American Legion in 1919, and it was here that the organization adopted its constitution. Many American Legion posts are named in honor of individuals with connections to the Legion's founding members. One such post is Fred W. Stockham–St. Louis Post 4. Read more »

29, July 2016

Leading the Way in War Work

Several women's organizations in St. Louis played pivotal roles in leading war-work efforts on the home front during World War I. Without these groups' backing, troops connected to the St. Louis region may not have retained the strength and morale needed to achieve success in the war. Read more »