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28, October 2013

African American Pioneers in 1968: Margaret Bush Wilson

The 1968 Exhibit sheds light on the national landscape of American culture, politics, movements, music, and more of that tumultuous year. While preparing for the exhibit's opening, Community Education & Events intern Domonique Taylor studied the content in search of ways to showcase St. Louis’s own contributions to the era. She focused her attention on four accomplished African American St. Louis women. These women embody the characteristics of the time period in their fights for equality and success in male-dominated fields. Read more »

25, October 2013

Hometown Hockey Team Links to 1968

Many events occurred in and around 1968, from the controversial Vietnam War and the assassinations of Dr. Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy, to the election of Richard Nixon and the successful Apollo 8 mission. On one hand, popular culture and music echoed the opinions of this fractured society by staging anti-war demonstrations and producing memorable albums like Jimi Hendrix’s Electric Ladyland and the Beatles' "White Album." On the other hand, consumerism boomed during the largest period of economic expansion in U.S. Read more »

24, October 2013

Civil War Love Letters: October 24, 1863

On October 21, 1863, James arrived at the hospital at Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia, where Confederates primarily held Union officers. The building was originally a warehouse for Libby & Son, a ship chandlery, grocer, and commercial agent. It could be guarded easily and was accessible by railroad and river transportation. The prison was three stories high in the front and  four stories in the back. The first floor of the building consisted of an office for the Confederates in the west room, a room for cooking in the middle, and a hospital in the east room. Read more »

18, October 2013

“Where Did They Go to High School?”: A Brief History of the First High Schools in St. Louis

Part 2: Public Schools and African American Schools

The first public high school in St. Louis was founded in 1853, although it sadly closed in 1984, after 131 years. Known as Central High School, or simply “the High School,” this school was originally housed in a room of the public elementary school near Benton Park.[...]

Image at left: Central High School, Davison Avenue and Natural Bridge Road location. Photograph by W. C. Persons, 1937. Missouri History Museum. Read more »

17, October 2013

Vietnam Veterans Give Huey Helicopter a Lift for The 1968 Exhibit

When you come to visit The 1968 Exhibit (now through January 5) at the Missouri History Museum, one of the first things you’ll encounter is a “Huey” helicopter that was flown in Vietnam. Although it logged many hours in the air, the helicopter arrives via crate these days and has to be assembled at each museum it visits as part of the traveling exhibit. Read more »

16, October 2013

African American Pioneers in 1968: Frankie Muse Freeman

The 1968 Exhibit sheds light on the national landscape of American culture, politics, movements, music, and more of that tumultuous year. While preparing for the exhibit's opening, Community Education & Events intern Domonique Taylor studied the content in search of ways to showcase St. Louis’s own contributions to the era. She focused her attention on four accomplished African American St. Louis women. These women embody the characteristics of the time period in their fights for equality and success in male-dominated fields. Read more »

10, October 2013

A Visual Symphony of St. Louis

Art imitates life. This statement probably wouldn't have become a cliché had it not, in some sense, been true. It was certainly true in the early days of the art of filmmaking. In 1903, in a theater in New York City, a film called The Great Train Robbery had its debut. Students in film schools across the country are taught that this 12-minute film led to the dawn of modern narrative cinema, with it described as a "faithful imitation of the genuine 'Hold Ups' made famous by various outlaw bands in the far West" (Brooklyn Clipper, December 19, 1903). Read more »

10, October 2013

Civil War Love Letters: October 10, 1863

After 10 days at a Confederate field hospital, James was transported, along with other wounded prisoners, to Atlanta, where he wrote this brief letter to Molly’s brother Alex. James’s name was not included in the lists of casualties published in the Daily Missouri Republican or the Missouri Democrat newspapers. However, many of the soldiers in James’s regiment, who saw him fall after being shot, believed that he had been killed. Read more »

7, October 2013

African American Pioneers in 1968: Josephine Baker

The 1968 Exhibit sheds light on the national landscape of American culture, politics, movements, music, and more of that tumultuous year. While preparing for the exhibit's opening, Community Education & Events intern Domonique Taylor studied the content in search of ways to showcase St. Louis’s own contributions to the era. She focused her attention on four accomplished African American St. Louis women. These women embody the characteristics of the time period in their fights for equality and success in male-dominated fields. Read more »

4, October 2013

“Where Did They Go to High School?”: A Brief History of the First High Schools in St. Louis

Part 1: Catholic Schools

One question I have heard again and again since arriving in St. Louis is that ubiquitous one: “Where did you go to high school?” As a non-native, I am mostly excused from answering this, but, when I mention my St. Louis–born boyfriend, I am often asked where HE went to school. Recently, this prompted me to do a little research on the history of high school education in St. Louis.

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