Advertisement for MHM's "#1 in Civil Rights" exhibit
Past St. Louis Cardinals baseball players
Pageant and Masque crew and assorted costumed cast members with Art Hill in the distance, 1914.
8, March 2016

7 Eye-Opening Old Timey Cures

Advertisements for patent medicines, also known as home remedies or nostrums, were a staple of newspapers in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The popularity of nostrums was in large part due to the limitations of 19th-century medical care. Read more »

2, March 2016

Miss Nettie's Ghost

When I started at the Missouri History Museum about 10 years ago, I remember being in the Jefferson Memorial portion of the building when a door slammed shut with no one behind it. “What was that?” I asked. “Just Miss Nettie’s ghost,” was the answer. Over the years, if a label stubbornly refused to stay on a wall, if a door in the old part of the building opened or closed by itself, I would often hear that it was Miss Nettie making her presence known. Read more »

26, February 2016

Dr. Herman Dreer and Black History Month in St. Louis

Every February, communities across America come together to explore, learn, and celebrate influential African Americans like Harriet Tubman, Muhammad Ali, Ella Fitzgerald, and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This celebration hasn’t always been the norm, however. The roots of Black History Month go back to 1915, when Carter G. Woodson, a Harvard professor, and Jesse E. Read more »

16, February 2016

Terror in the Headlines

Historic newspapers are a fantastic resource. They can’t tell us everything: They can’t tell us how people responded to the news they read. They can’t tell us whether their stories were ignored or clipped out and put up on people’s refrigerators. They can’t tell us how small tragedies or celebrations may have caused individuals to ignore the news for a few days, as happens to all of us from time to time. But the newspapers can tell us a lot about how people in the past first learned of events big and small. Read more »

9, February 2016

Eye on Exhibits: We Aim to Disappoint

We’ve been hearing a lot of complaints from our visitors lately, and quite frankly, we couldn’t be happier. I assure you we aren’t usually happy when we hear about disappointed visitors, but in this case we think it’s a good sign. Let me explain. Read more »

4, February 2016

All Aboard! Historic Images of St. Louis Union Station

With news that renovations and improvments at Union Station have begun, we dove into our photograph and print collection to find some historic photos of this spectacular building, completed in 1874. Read more »

2, February 2016

Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America

Today, it seems like we can’t go to any of our favorite news sites without seeing at least one story about terrorism and sabotage. The threat of terrorism is a part of every news cycle, a part of the conversations that Americans from New York to Los Angeles are having with their family and friends. All this talk of terrorism and internal threats makes it seem like we’ve entered a new era in American history. In some ways this isn’t wrong. The word "terrorism" is fairly new; it wasn’t used widely until the 1970s although it was originally coined during the French Revolution in the 1790s. Read more »

28, January 2016

Humans of MHM | Elizabeth Pickard, Director of Intepretive Programs

Ever wonder who puts together the incredible theatre performances, field trips, and educational programs here at the Museum? That would be Elizabeth, our director of interpretive programs. What constitutes an interpretive program, you might ask? Watch below to learn more.

 

14, January 2016

Seven Stadiums from St. Louis's Past

On January 12, 2016, with the announcement that the St. Louis Rams would be relocating to Los Angeles, the St. Louis region began a discussion about the future of the now-teamless Edward Jones Dome. While there are many uncertainties regarding the future of the Dome, it's far from the first St. Louis stadium to see a transition. Here's a chance to test your knowledge of St. Louis's past stadiums and the teams that called them home—some are well remembered, but others might be a surprise! Read more »

12, January 2016

Where Did You Go To High School?

This question is a common one in St. Louis, where an alma mater is a high school, not a college, and where using high school as an identifier is an often accepted ritual. But can the answer to that question really sum up all of the experiences of high school? Read more »