Advertisement for MHM's "#1 in Civil Rights" exhibit
Past St. Louis Cardinals baseball players
Pageant and Masque crew and assorted costumed cast members with Art Hill in the distance, 1914.
8, May 2017

MHM Wins National Award for Diversity and Accessibility

Today we at the Missouri History Museum were honored to take the stage with our colleagues at The Field Museum in Chicago to accept the American Alliance of Museums’s (AAM) inaugural Award for Diversity, Equity, Accessibility, and Inclusion. Although we certainly don’t do our work with awards in mind, this one is pretty special. Read more »

3, May 2017

Deeds of Mistrust

Across the first half of the 20th century, realtors and white homeowners used restrictive deed covenants to stem African Americans' “invasion” of American cities. Such covenants bound those who signed them, as well as subsequent owners, to limit whom a property could be sold to and who could live there. Read more »

30, April 2017

How Did Route 66 Get Its Number?

The black-and-white Route 66 shield is an internationally recognized symbol of America, on par with the Golden Gate Bridge, Gateway Arch, and Statue of Liberty. The road itself is a 2,400-mile icon of America’s collective memory. Even for those of us who weren’t around to drive it during its heyday, the number 66 is mythical. But what if that number had been different, like 60, 62, or even 60N? Read more »

27, April 2017

Have You Met an ACTivist Yet?

Whether introducing new generations to St. Louis's civil rights legacy or reminding older ones of its existence, the ACTivists Project ensures the people and stories of our community's freedom struggle will not be forgotten. This theatre-based project is a counterpart to our #1 in Civil Rights exhibit. Read more »

25, April 2017

How the Spanish-American War Met the Society Pages

It’s probably been a while since a St. Louis Post-Dispatch editor has penned several hundred exasperated words about the tango.

 
21, April 2017

Isaac Sievers: The Man Who'd Photograph Anything

Isaac Sievers—Sievers Studio founder and the man behind many of the photographs featured in our Picturing 1930s St. Louis project—was the son of a German immigrant and an Arkansas native. The 1910 census, which lists him working as a salesman in the “picture line” industry in his hometown of Greenville, Mississippi, reveals that he’d already been bitten by the photography bug at just 24 years old. Read more »

19, April 2017

Curator Faves: Clothing Edition

The Missouri History Museum has a wonderful clothing and textile collection, and I've had the honor of being responsible for it for almost 17 years. Because the collection is made of up more than 18,000 pieces, it’s hard to know every single thing within it, but by working on exhibits, writing articles, giving tours, and meeting with researchers, I learn more every day. To me the collection is like a treasure trove of two of my favorite things: history and fashion. I find something I’ve never seen before almost every time I go into storage, which keeps my job interesting. Read more »

13, April 2017

Jordan Chambers: The Negro Mayor of St. Louis

In 1931 the St. Louis Post-Dispatch referred to Jordan Chambers, who held no official political office, as the Negro Mayor of St. Louis. Chambers was larger than life, a political power broker whose influence was far reaching. It was said that little happened in St. Louis politics—or in the black community in general—that Chambers didn’t somehow have a hand in. Read more »

10, April 2017

66 Through St. Louis: Crestwood Bowl

Let’s be honest: For most people, bowling falls into the just-for-kicks category, which makes it feel right at home on Route 66. These days bowling is a hobby at best, something to break up a long family road trip, an activity to do when family visits from out of town, or a relaxing way to spend a weekend night. If you were to ask most people about bowling’s place in the professional-sports world, they might laugh or shrug before readily admitting that bowling is no baseball or football, games with widely accepted greats and unmatched naturals. Read more »

6, April 2017

World War I: Missouri and the Great War

Today marks the centennial of America’s entry into World War I. Within months of the April 6, 1917, declaration of war, U.S. troops began arriving in France, factories across the nation started producing war material, and support began pouring in from the home front. Our newest exhibit, World War I: Missouri and the Great War, commemorates this significant portion of our collective history by exploring the wartime roles of Missourians and St. Louisans at home and overseas.  Read more »