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Past St. Louis Cardinals baseball players
Pageant and Masque crew and assorted costumed cast members with Art Hill in the distance, 1914.
20, June 2017

7 Memorable STL Sports Moments

St. Louis is a sports town, no doubt. Local teams and hometown heroes have provided countless action-packed, exhilarating, frustrating, and heartrending moments for fans near and far over the years, but some of those moments stand out even more than others. Here's just a handful of 'em, in no particular order. Read more »

15, June 2017

Famous for Freedom Suits

In 2013 the judges of the 22nd Judicial Circuit voted to create a memorial to the lawyers and slaves who litigated hundreds of freedom suits here in St. Louis. Prior to the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Dred Scott v. Sandford, Missouri’s legal system operated under a “once free, always free” policy. This meant that if an enslaved person was taken into a free state for more than a brief amount of time, he or she was free. Read more »

9, June 2017

The St. Louis Party That Started a Phenomenon

On a sunny Sunday afternoon in May 1917, a group of St. Louis’s A-list gathered at a home in the Central West End neighborhood. The occasion was relaxed, a way for friends to enjoy conversation and cocktails on a pleasant spring day—it was also the first organized cocktail party in recorded history. Read more »

7, June 2017

66 Through St. Louis: Spencer's Grill

When most St. Louisans think of Route 66, they tend to think of Watson Road in South County. Watson is widely known as Historic Route 66. With stops such as Ted DrewesDonut Drive-InCrestwood Bowl, and the gone-but-still-infamous Coral Court all within a few miles, it’s easy to see why that stretch is so memorable. But when Route 66 passed through large cities, it was rarely just one road; drivers could actually choose which alignment of Route 66 they wanted to take. Read more »

31, May 2017

Now Play Ball . . . On the Radio?

What could have captured the attention of this many St. Louisans in the early years of the Great Depression? Cardinals baseball, of course! In this photo taken for the Sievers Studio by Harold Sneckner, fans gathered outside of the Hunleth Music Company to listen to game 4 of the 1931 World Series between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Philadelphia Athletics. Look closely and you’ll see the radio perched on the fire escape. Something we take for granted now—listening to baseball games on the radio—was considered fairly cutting edge in the early 1930s. It was also somewhat controversial. Read more »

29, May 2017

Commemorating the Spirit of Sacrifice in War

Since it opened on Memorial Day 1938, Soldiers Memorial Military Museum has been—and continues to be—a place of remembrance. At its dedication as a World War I memorial two years earlier, President Franklin D. Roosevelt said: Read more »

25, May 2017

Supporting Civil Rights for All

Not long ago, the Holocaust Museum & Learning Center and the St. Louis Jewish Community Archives developed an exhibition called Standing for Justice. The first part (1930–1950) focused on anti-Semitism and discrimination against the St. Louis Jewish community in everything from housing and employment to swimming-pool access and the Red Scare. Material for the follow-up exhibition (1950–1980) revealed a gradual change in focus in the post-WWII-era Jewish community, one that strongly involved fighting for the civil rights of all people. Read more »

23, May 2017

How James B. Eads Conquered the Mighty Mississippi

The Mississippi River has beckoned millions of people to settle up and down its fertile banks, inspiring countless creative works. It has been personified in song, and its ever-changing nature has been used as a metaphor for life itself. But James Buchanan Eads didn’t find inspiration on the Mississippi’s surface—he found it below. Read more »

21, May 2017

Does the World Still Care about Charles Lindbergh?

On May 21, 1927, airmail pilot Charles Lindbergh became the first person to fly nonstop across the Atlantic Ocean. As he navigated the Spirit of St. Louis from New York to Paris, the world watched closely. When the plane touched down at Le Bourget Airport in Paris, a jubilant crowd greeted the aviator and created shockwaves of excitement that could be felt around the globe. Newspaper headlines lauded Lindbergh’s feat, throngs of people followed his every move, and various heads of state and dignitaries awarded him with medals of honor and extraordinary gifts. Read more »

17, May 2017

It Sure Is Good, Guys and Gals!

If you’re from this area or have lived here for some time, those words—the tagline for Ted Drewes Frozen Custard—instantly conjure thoughts of summer and the quintessential St. Louis frozen treat: a concrete you can turn upside down without spilling a drop. Read more »