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Past St. Louis Cardinals baseball players
Pageant and Masque crew and assorted costumed cast members with Art Hill in the distance, 1914.
20, January 2010

St. Louis Students Win Essay Contest on Health Care

On December 10, 2009, the Missouri History Museum hosted a forum on public health care. A panel of experts, including Rep. Tishaura Jones, Amy Smoucha (Jobs with Justice) and Myrna Fichtenbaum, addressed such issues as racial disparities in health care, income levels’ effect on health care, and the natural right to health care, which is included in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The program also recognized winning essays by Metro St. Louis–area students in the thirteenth annual Human Rights Essay Contest, sponsored by the St. Louis Coalition for Human Rights. Read more »

13, January 2010

From the Collections—Hand-crafted Brew Kettle, ca. 1840

One of St. Louis’s early beer brewers, J. Adam Lemp was the first to produce lager west of Philadelphia. In 1840, he established the Western Brewery at 37 South Second Street, between Walnut and Elm. Read more »

1, January 2010

Katherine Dunham's Haiti

In February 1992, Katherine Dunham—humanist, activist, anthropologist, dancer, and innovative teacher—was 82 years old. The year before, following a government coup, thousands of Haitians had attempted a perilous three-day, 600-mile crossing to the United States, only to be turned back or interned.  It was this treatment of the Haitian people that spurred Miss Dunham to undertake a hunger strike that would last 47 days and end only after personal pleas from ousted Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Read more »

27, December 2009

In Print—St. Louis from Village to Metropolis

St. Louis from Village to Metropolis: Essays from the Missouri Historical Review, 1906–2006, edited and with an introduction by Louis S. Gerteis (Columbia: The State Historical Society of Missouri, 2009)

Reviewed by Emily Troxell Jaycox
Librarian, Missouri History Museum
Read more »

13, December 2009

From the Collections—Civil War Flag Conservation

The museum has recently undertaken a major conservation effort on several Civil War flags. Take a look at some of the dramatic changes seen to just one-- the Confederate First National 8-star flag of the 1st Missouri Infantry.

Regiments were required to bear two flags--regimental colors and a national flag. This flag was reputedly flown by the 1st Missouri Infantry, a unit that fought in the Vicksburg and Atlanta campaigns and sustained heavy losses during the war. Read more »

13, December 2009

Newsworthy—E. Desmond Lee, Missouri History Museum Benefactor and St. Louis Philanthropist, 1917–2010

E. Desmond “Des” Lee, has died at age 92 of complications from a stroke. Lee was a generous donor to the Missouri History Museum and many St. Louis institutions.

Lee was born in Sikeston, MO, and attended Washington University in St. Louis. While still in school, he and friend Jim Rowan cofounded Lee-Rowan Manufacturing Company, which designed hangers, shelving, and closet accessories. The company grew exponentially after the war. After Lee sold it in 1993, he created the E. Read more »

13, December 2009

Garbage Dreams

GARBAGE DREAMS by Mai Iskander:

Welcome to the world’s largest garbage village located on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt. The Zaballeen (Arabic for garbage people) recycle 80 percent of the trash they collect—far more than other recycling initiatives. But now a multi-national corporation threatens their livelihood. Read more »

13, December 2009

What Will Happen to Historic Sumner High School?

Sumner High School opened in St. Louis in 1875, earning the distinction of being the first public high school for African Americans west of the Mississippi River. Over the decades, the school could boast of teaching many future prominent educators, as well as its share of famous alumni. Read more »